Effective Home Fellowships & Conflicts

5 Simple Ways Keep Tempers Cool During Conflicts

 Whether you’re the Rabbi or a Pastor or just a simple Host of your home fellowship, chances are you’ve had a conflict or two to deal with. But while some good-natured Midrashing can be a good thing, sometimes these conflicts get overheated fast. 

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Whether you’re in leadership or not, you’re going to need to know what to do when conflict arises. Add to that the fact that you might be called upon to serve with those who you’ve struggled with. Indeed, knowing how to keep your cool during fellowship conflicts becomes one of those critical ‘must-have’ skills if you desire to glorify our Elohim.

Home Fellowship in Living Room
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 How to Maintain and Effective Home Fellowship

  Model and Teach How to Know When to Walk Away 

Leaving is something of an art. The last thing you want is for the other person to think you’re not listening to what they have to say. However, every argument reaches that point where no one is saying anything new. It’s about here that things start to get personal, and indeed uncomfortable. That is the point to take a break. But even this takes skill. Excuse yourself quietly. It’s not the time for the dramatic exit. 

Calm Down and Clear Your Head 

Shofars from the Holy Land - Made in Israel

Desiring to maintain an effective Home Fellowship will help you to remain both calmer and more rational. Once you’ve removed yourself from the situation, take a few minutes for yourself. Breathe deeply. Practice mindfulness and pray until you’re in a better place and able to be in control of yourself. Find that inner peace.

Get Busy – Leading or Helping Home Fellowships

 For some people, being emotionally wrought leads toward a need for activity. If you’re one of these people, then use this energy to serve your people. Studies have shown that people can be very productive when they’ve been worked up. Also, consider that by channeling all that emotional energy into serving, you’ll find that you’re able to be very focused and even more useful than usual.

Practicing Mitzvot towards those you are frustrated with is most effective!

 Practice Empathy in Your Home Fellowship

 It’s not always easy to put yourself in the other person’s shoes, but it does help. Realize that there might be something more going on with the other person than there appears to be on the surface. That will not only help you to chill, but also might show you a possible solution, or at least a new way to address the other person in a way that’s respectful and more compassionate. 

Keep in mind that your insights might well show you that the problem is with you. In that case, it might be time to acknowledge the log in your eye to the person in question. Sometimes bringing leadership into the situation is necessary or at the least sit down with a mediator to help resolve the matter.

Home Fellowship meeting at park
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Reconcile, Restoration & Repentance

 Try apologizing. Recognize that it does take two people to get into an argument. Apologizing acknowledges the part that you’ve played in the situation and invites the other person to do the same. 

In the end, the best way to maintain an effective Home Fellowship situation is to resolve conflicts when they occur.

Having a conflict may be inevitable. How you deal with conflict says a great deal about you as a person and a great deal about you as a Believer. 

Being able to model Shalom in trying situations is an invaluable skill and one well worth cultivating, especially in the realm of leading and/or attending Home Fellowships.

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